Hello

Hello page,
It’s been a journey…
Yes, a journey
It’s been more than a walk
Yes, a walk to remember

Hello page,
It’s been a story,
Yes a story
It’s been more than scenarios
Yes, so many scenes unforgettable

Hello page
It’s been a life
Yes a life
It’s been more than days
Yes, days rolling by

Hello page…
There’s so much to say
Yet so little is said
This is my journey, my walk
This is my story, my scenes
This is my life, my days…

Hello page!

-Opeoluwa

Sometimes

Sometimes, you think you have it all figured out
Well, only sometimes
Sometimes, you feel life is being too good to believe
You know that’s only sometimes
Sometimes, you desire super great things and you get them
I guess that happens also sometimes
Sometimes are sometimes
Enjoy sometimes
Live sometimes
Pray for all sometimes
Rejoice at all sometimes
And soon you will find that sometimes actually make most times and gets better when you can be glad for sometimes

Sometimes, pardon my use of “sometimes”, you know what I mean right?
Smiles…
It’s for you sweety

Happy Birthday Mummy Fadeke

Specially dedicated to my wonderful aunt Fadeke today on her birthday.
Never been more certain about the path to a capable wife. No need for so much search. Let us see her and praise her… her excellency!

Proverbs 31 GNT
The Capable Wife
10 How hard it is to find a capable wife! She is worth far more than jewels!
(there’s need to mine and diligently search for her excellency)
11 Her husband puts his confidence in her, and he will never be poor.
(she is true source of wealth)
12 As long as she lives, she does him good and never harm.
(hmmm… NEVER harm)
13 She keeps herself busy making wool and linen cloth.
(busy at her career? *surprised face now*)
14 She brings home food from out-of-the-way places, as merchant ships do.
(she goes out)
15 She gets up before daylight to prepare food for her family and to tell her servant women what to do.
(early at waking up. *I need to learn this and imbibe this habit* oh! She even has maids too, yet instructs them)
16 She looks at land and buys it, and with money she has earned she plants a vineyard.
(insightful woman with foresight, saves, invests, and keeps growing)
17 She is a hard worker, strong and industrious.
(need I say more?)
18 She knows the value of everything she makes, and works late into the night.
19 She spins her own thread and weaves her own cloth.
20 She is generous to the poor and needy.
21 She doesn’t worry when it snows, because her family has warm clothing.
22 She makes bedspreads and wears clothes of fine purple linen.
23 Her husband is well known, one of the leading citizens.
24 She makes clothes and belts, and sells them to merchants.
25 She is strong and respected and not afraid of the future.
26 She speaks with a gentle wisdom.
27 She is always busy and looks after her family’s needs.
28 Her children show their appreciation, and her husband praises her.
29 He says, “Many women are good wives, but you are the best of them all.”
30 Charm is deceptive and beauty disappears, but a woman who honors the Lord should be praised.
31 Give her credit for all she does. She deserves the respect of everyone.
(Yes! She is… her excellency!)

Originally dedicated to my mum, Mrs Gbagi, the capable wives and my dear readers.

Technobrities Series: Mike Lazaridis of BlackBerry

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/the-inside-story-of-why-blackberry-is-failing/article14563602/?page=all

Mike Lazaridis was at home on his treadmill and watching television when he first saw the Apple iPhone in early 2007. There were a few things he didn’t understand about the product. So, that summer, he pried one open to look inside and was shocked. It was like Apple had stuffed a Mac computer into a cellphone, he thought.

To Mr. Lazaridis, a life-long tinkerer who had built an oscilloscope and computer while in high school, the iPhone was a device that broke all the rules. The operating system alone took up 700 megabytes of memory, and the device used two processors. The entire BlackBerry ran on one processor and used 32 MB. Unlike the BlackBerry, the iPhone had a fully Internet-capable browser. That meant it would strain the networks of wireless companies like AT&T Inc., something those carriers hadn’t previously allowed. RIM by contrast used a rudimentary browser that limited data usage.

“I said, ‘How did they get AT&T to allow [that]?’ Mr. Lazaridis recalled in the interview at his Waterloo office. “ ‘It’s going to collapse the network.’ And in fact, some time later it did.”

Publicly, Mr. Lazaridis and Mr. Balsillie belittled the iPhone and its shortcomings, including its short battery life, weaker security and initial lack of e-mail. That earned them a reputation for being cocky and, eventually, out of touch. “That’s marketing,” Mr. Lazaridis explained. “You position your strengths against their weaknesses.”

Internally, he had a very different message. “If that thing catches on, we’re competing with a Mac, not a Nokia,” he recalled telling his staff.

RIM soon earned a chance to show up its new rival. RIM’s early smartphones had been a hit for Verizon Wireless, one of the biggest U.S. wireless players. Frozen out of the iPhone – Apple had signed an exclusive deal with AT&T – Verizon executives approached RIM in June, 2007, and asked if it could develop “an iPhone killer.” The product would need to have a touchscreen with no physical keyboard. Verizon would back the U.S. launch with a massive marketing campaign.
For 20 years, Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis operated in tandem, building an increasingly successful partnership that allowed each other’s strengths to flourish.

They shared an office in their early years, even possessing each other’s voice mail passwords.

As RIM grew, they worked in separate buildings but spoke several times a day. “They had a relationship I wish I had with my wife,” one mid-level executive said.

But they had different personalities and their lives seldom intersected outside the office. They have barely spoken since leaving the company.

For Mr. Lazaridis, science was both a job and a pastime. Mr. Balsillie was brash, competitive and athletic, and wore his reputation for being aggressive, even bullying in meetings, as a badge of honour. If anything, he viewed that outward toughness as a job requirement, not unlike tech CEOs such as Steve Ballmer at Microsoft Corp. or Apple’s Steve Jobs. “Show me how else you build a $20-billion company,” he once confided to a colleague. “If I was Mr. Easy-going, they would kill BlackBerry.”

The two rarely disagreed on key strategic moves – until their last year together. Mr. Lazaridis believed BlackBerry 10 would herald RIM’s renaissance. Mr. Balsillie wasn’t so sure.
As for Mr. Lazaridis, he has not given up on the enterprise he founded 29 years ago. He is still a minority shareholder in BlackBerry, and he believes the BlackBerry story is not over. “Many companies go through cycles. Intel experienced it, IBM experienced it, Apple experienced it. Our job was to reinvent ourselves, which we all believed BB10 would do,” he said. “The fact that a Canadian company was able to compete in that space with two of the largest tech companies in the world is a big deal. People counted IBM, Apple and other companies out only to be proven wrong. I am rooting that they are wrong on BlackBerry as well.”

With reports from Tara Perkins, Omar El Akkad and Iain Marlow

Welcome!

The brand Wonuolawale…

It’s like a puzzle… piecing this million pieces together. Daunting at first! You think it’s impossible. You feel overwhelmed. You almost can throw in the towel. Good thing is I found out you are my one missing piece. Yes! You. Helping young minds realize their dreams becoming all they want to be while I realize mine in providing cheaper, readily-available energy supply is the solution. That’s it! That’s most about Wonuolawale…

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